The War Against Christianity: The National Cathedral to Rewrite History While Worshipping at the Altar of Political Correctness

th (74)If you ever had any doubt that Modern American Liberals had  ensconced Political Correctness as the new “State Religion”, today’s post should remove all doubts..

A couple of days ago, CNN.com reported that

Leaders at the Washington National Cathedral have voted unanimously to remove Confederate battle flags from stained-glass windows memorializing Confederate generals Robert E. Lee and Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson.

The symbols will be replaced with panes of plain glass, the National Cathedral said in a statement issued Wednesday.
The development comes as the church plans forums on racism, slavery and racial reconciliation. The long-term future of the Lee and Jackson windows will be discussed.
 
The Confederate battle flag was featured prominently in pictures posted by Dylann Roof.
Roof has been charged with killing nine people at a Bible study in Charleston, South Carolina, on June 17, 2015. He confessed in interviews with Charleston police and the FBI, two law enforcement officials told CNN. He also told investigators he wanted to start a race war, one of those officials said.
The incident sparked a national debate about whether state and private institutions in the South and beyond should feature the Confederate flag, which many see as a symbol of racial oppression.
The National Cathedral is owned by the Episcopal Diocese of Washington, but is often used for national prayer services and the funerals of top Washington officials, including former President Gerald Ford.
In the statement, cathedral leaders said no date is set for the removal of the Confederate symbols.
The Rev. Dr. Kelly Brown Douglas, the cathedral’s canon theologian, said the change will provide “an opportunity for us to begin to write a new narrative on race and racial justice at the Cathedral and perhaps for our nation.”
The windows will remain in place for the duration of future public discussions, the cathedral said. The first session is set for July 17.
The windows were installed in 1953 at the request of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and are two of many stained-glass bays on the cathedral’s main level.
The two windows were put in place to honor “the lives and legacies of Confederate Generals Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee,” according to the Very Rev. Gary Hall, former dean of the National Cathedral.
Hall last year said the National Cathedral had installed these windows to “foster reconciliation” between the North and the South. But they did more than simply seek to repair a divided nation, he said.
They sought to “reframe the Civil War and present these two generals as saintly, exemplary Christians” when these two men were in fact ardent supporters of Hall called an “unjust cause … the sin of slavery.”
“We can live with some contradictions until we can’t,” Hall said.
Make no mistake about it. This is a purely political move.
The National Cathedral, since falling under the control of those who worship at the altar of  Modern American Liberalism and Political Correctness, has become an extension of the Political Policies of the Democratic Party.
The was no reframing done, when those images were added at the National Cathedral.
General Robert E. Lee and General Stonewall Jackson were Christian Americans.
In a review of the book, “Robert E. Lee: The Christian”, Tim Challies, blogger, author, and book reviewer, writes the following on his website, http://www.challies.com:
In writing Robert E. Lee: The Christian, William J. Johnson sifted through hundreds of letters written to and from Lee as well as accounts written of him, seeking to find evidence of this Civil War general’s faith. Having found ample evidence, the author concludes that Lee’s correspondance “reveals him as a man who lived in the presence of God; who looked to God continually for guidance and strength; whose mind and heart were saturated with faith and trust in God.” The nearly 300 pages of this book are dedicated to showing example after example of Lee’s obvious love for and trust in his Creator.

This book is not a biography. Rather, it is a collection of hundreds of quotes taken from Lee’s letters, mostly those written to his family, but also ones he wrote to his superiors, subordinates and friends. Lee’s words outnumber the author’s by a large margin, likely four to one or even higher. Johnson provides hundreds of examples of Lee’s trust in God, his Christian character and his love for the Lord. He was a true spiritual giant, one of many to emerge from the Civil War (I think also of Abraham Lincoln, Stonewall Jackson, and others).

A little dry, but well worth reading for Civil War enthusiasts, this book proves that Robert E. Lee should be an inspiration for all believers.

According to a review of a biography of General Stonewall Jackson, “Onward Christian Solider”, found in The New York Times,
Stonewall Jackson would fight in 16 Civil War engagements, and his nickname dates from the first one, at Manassas, where troops were rallied by the cry ”Look, men, there is Jackson standing like a stone wall!” By the time of the last one, Mr. Robertson writes, ”his fame flashed across his own Southern Confederacy, soared over the land of his enemies and traveled even beyond the seas.” To explain this meteoric rise, he takes as his text the prediction of one of Jackson’s wartime aides, James Power Smith: ”The religion of Stonewall Jackson will be the chief and most effective way into the secret spring of the character and career of this strong man.”Jackson was fanatical in his Presbyterian faith, and it energized his military thought and character. Theology was the only subject he genuinely enjoyed discussing. His dispatches invariably credited an ever-kind Providence. Assigning his fate to God’s hands, he acted utterly fearlessly on the battlefield — and expected the same of everyone else in Confederate gray. Jackson’s God smiled south, blessing him with the strength of Joshua to smite the Amalekites without mercy. Previous biographers have ignored or soft-pedaled this mercilessness in war, but Mr. Robertson underlines it as a source of Jackson’s fierce battlefield leadership.

This fanatical religiosity had drawbacks. It warped Jackson’s judgment of men, leading to poor appointments; it was said he preferred good Presbyterians to good soldiers. It branded him holier-than-thou, with an intolerance for others’ frailties, and this spilled over onto the battlefield to generate truly senseless confrontations with his lieutenants. One such, with General Hill, led Hill to rage at ”that crazy old Presbyterian fool” and seek to escape from Jackson’s command. Another lieutenant, reading in a Jackson dispatch that ”God blessed our arms with victory,” remarked irreverently, ”I suppose it is true, but we would have had no victory if we hadn’t fought like the devil!”

 On the wall beside my computer desk, hangs my family crest, which I shipped to my Daddy (Southern Colloquialism for male parental unit) in the summer of 1978, from the York Insignia Shoppe in England.

This same family crest also hangs in the home of Jefferson Davis, distinguished Graduate of West Point Academy, and the President of the Confederate States of America.

 I am a proud Southerner, who through bloodline, is related to General Robert E. Lee.

As a Christian American, I attend church on Sunday mornings with my brothers and sisters in Christ, both black and white.

American Progressives, both Democrat and Republican, have taken advantage of the horrible church massacre in Charleston, SC, to accomplish something that they have been trying to do for years: minimize the South’s political clout and erase our uniqueness as a region, through the taking away of a symbol of our heritage, and, any traces of the historical aspects of the Confederate Side of the Civil War, as exemplified by the mission began by Former Memphis Mayor AC Wharton and his minions on the City Council to dig up Nathan Bedford Forrest and his wife, and move their bodies and a statue of the general, which all currently “reside” in a downtown park in the Medical Center. (Of course, the real reason is the fact that the University of Tennessee Center for the Health Sciences wants to buy the park, which sits in the middle of the Medical Center, for the purposes of expansion…but, no one talks about that.)

Several years ago, I bore witness to an annual Civil War Reenactment, which is held every Memorial Day on the Civil War Battlefield of Shiloh.

Cannons are fired, guns discharge, while men feign falling in battle.

All that day, “Decoration Day” was observed, as family members laid flowers on the graves of those who had been laid to rest at  Historic Shiloh Cemetery.

This yearly event is a solemn occasion, a chance to teach young Americans about the sacrifices of those who came before them.

And now, a bunch of spineless jellyfish, far removed from that historic battleground in Middle Tennessee, worshipping at the Altar of Political Correctness, instead of the God of Abraham, are rewriting history at America’s National Cathedral.

Judging Fellow Christian Americans, like the Pharisees judged Christ, in the name of Political  Expediency.

The dead can not fight back.

This is beyond disgraceful.

And, Professional Politicians and those who live and thrive as a result of the Washingtonian Status Quo, like those who operate the National Cathedral, cannot for the life of them figure out why a non-politician is going to be the next President of the United States of America.

Until He Comes,

KJ

 

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2 Responses to “The War Against Christianity: The National Cathedral to Rewrite History While Worshipping at the Altar of Political Correctness”

  1. Frank Clark Says:

    This is well written and historically correct. I am not a southerner, but I have known of Lee’s close relationship with the Lord for years and have taught it in my American history classes over the years. Those who don’t know their history accurately (called liberals today) are bound to repeat its failures.

  2. The National Cathedral, the Southern Baptist Convention, and the Banning of the Confederate Battle Flag..."Lest Ye Be Judged." - Hotgas.net Says:

    […] little over a week ago, The Washing­ton Post reported the follow­ing story, which I wrote an article […]

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