Trump’s First Address to Congress: “Are You Ready to Rummmbllle?”

fine-tuned-600-li

Get your popcorn ready, boys and girls. This promises to be good.

Foxnews.com reports that

President Trump is planning to outline an ambitious first-year agenda tackling everything from immigration to infrastructure when he delivers his first address to a Joint Session of Congress Tuesday night, the White House said.

The White House detailed Trump’s highly anticipated address on Monday, outlining what will be the president’s biggest speech since his inauguration. Press Secretary Sean Spicer said Trump will push a “bold agenda,” while another White House official described it as an “optimistic” look toward the next four years. 

For the new president, whose opening month has been marked by rapid-fire executive actions but also a string of controversies, the primetime televised address is a critical chance to reframe some of the more contentious aspects of his young presidency – and reinforce campaign pledges that have yet to kick into action, like repealing and replacing ObamaCare.

Spicer said the goals outlined in Tuesday’s speech will also strike a balance on the challenges ahead, while reflecting a more optimistic, forward-looking tone that focuses on the “American spirit.” 

Such a tone would strike a contrast with Trump’s inauguration address, marked by gloomy warnings about the country’s economic decay and rampant crime which he vowed to fix. The official said the same team of speechwriters who worked on the inaugural speech were working with Trump on Tuesday’s address. 

Spicer also said the president would highlight “public safety, including defense, increased border security, taking care of our veterans, and then economic opportunity, including education and job training, health care reform, jobs, taxes and regulatory reform.”

Trump is also expected to reach out to Americans “living in the poorest and most vulnerable communities, and let them know that help is on the way,” Spicer said.

Trump’s young administration has seen its share of growing pains.

The president has faced sustained resistance from Democrats, over everything from his Cabinet picks to his border security plans. But other issues have drawn bipartisan criticism from some corners: late-night tweets; the rocky rollout of the controversial suspension of refugee and other admissions (actions on hold by the courts and currently being rewritten); the forced resignation of national security adviser Michael Flynn following reports of contacts between him and a Russian diplomat; White House leaks driven by infighting; and strained relationships with China, Mexico and Australia.

Trump has an opportunity Tuesday to refocus on his policy priorities.

“This will be an opportunity for the people and their representatives to hear directly from our new president about his vision and our shared agenda,” House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said.

The White House official said much of the speech would be derived from so-called “listening sessions” Trump has held over the last several weeks with a number of interest groups, including law enforcement officials and union leaders. 

On Monday, Trump laid much of the groundwork for Tuesday’s speech, as he met with governors and health insurance CEOs in large part to discuss plans to replace ObamaCare.

The Obama legacy legislation has been a GOP target for many years. On the campaign trail, Trump repeatedly promised to repeal and replace it during his first 100 days in office. He went so far as to claim in the last few weeks of the general election that he would consider calling a special session of Congress to repeal it – something that has not happened.

Governors visiting Washington, D.C., over the weekend and on Monday voiced concern about the future of Medicaid and its related costs, but Trump insisted that the current insurance market is going to “absolutely implode” and something must be done.

The president also announced a “historic” $54 billion increase in defense spending, alongside cuts to almost every other federal agency as part of his forthcoming budget plan. “This budget will be a public safety and national security budget,” Trump said.

He added that he wanted to better prepare the military not only to prevent wars but also win them when called to fight.

During a meeting with governors at the White House on Monday, Trump also teased a “big statement” on infrastructure. He told the governors he plans to boost spending to rebuild the nation’s roads and bridges.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., asked what he wanted to hear from Trump on Tuesday, told a Chamber of Commerce crowd in Kentucky last week: “A tweet-free, optimistic and uplifting message about where America needs to go.”

Already, the Democratic leadership has issued a pre-buttal and called out Trump for being “a lot of bluster and blame.”

“The first month of a Trump presidency is less of a bang and more of a whimper,” Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., said. “Not much impact.”

Schumer predicted Trump’s speech “will mean nothing if this president continues to do as he’s done these first few weeks – breaking promises to working people, and putting an even greater burden on their backs while making it even easier to be wealthy and well connected in America.”

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi also needled the White House, saying it had failed to deliver on its promise to create jobs. 

“He has created a lot of jobs,” Spicer countered Monday at the daily press briefing. “I think that he is continuing to work with Congress on both repealing and replacing ObamaCare, tax reform and fundamentally both of those two items alone I think can help spur a lot of growth.”

While the traditions of Congress typically dictate an atmosphere of cordiality, there have been moments of outburst over the years that have hyped up the drama.

In 2009, Rep. Joe Wilson, R-S.C., blurted out “You lie!” during then-President Barack Obama’s address. The remark was viewed widely by both parties as disrespectful.

Michael Waldman, chief speechwriter for former President Bill Clinton, told The Associated Press that Trump could easily “blow up a speech” with just a few deviations from the text on his teleprompter.

Waldman added that opposition from Democrats could also throw Trump off his game. 

Following Trump’s speech, former Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear will deliver the Democratic response.

Perhaps the Governor will address the poor behavior planned by his fellow Democrats for Trump’s address.

Heatstreet.com reports that

Although President Donald Trump won’t be giving a formal State of the Union address Tuesday night (he’s only been in office a month), Democrats are still planning on making his address to a joint session of Congress as uncomfortable as possible.

Each legislator is allowed a handful of tickets for the public gallery, so that interested constituents and guests can be present for what is typically the President’s most important speech of the year. Most often, those tickets go to hometown heroes from the legislator’s respective districts, people who have made the news over the past year, or those who have benefitted from the administration’s policy agenda.

But the power can also be used for evil: Legislators have been known to pass off their tickets to protesters—including perennial anti-war activists Code Pink—or to special interest groups opposed to key items in the speech.

This year, Democrats will be using their tickets as part of an organized effort to invite the families of illegal immigrants, DREAMers protected by former President Obama’s executive orders on immigration, and Muslim-Americans they claim will be harmed by Trump’s temporary travel ban. (A court has stayed Trump’s travel ban.)

Rep. Nydia Velázquez from New York is inviting an Iraqi man who served American troops as a translator, and who was detained for several hours when the travel ban went into effect.  Rep. Jim Langevin will invite a Muslim-American born in Pakistan whom he says represents the idea that “patriotism” is not the sole purview of Trump voters.

 Since it would be hard to actually find an illegal immigrant willing to walk into the United States Capitol, Dems will instead bring several people helped by the DREAM act (which Trump says he won’t undo), and the family of a woman slated for deportation back to her home country of Mexico during a routine check-in with Immigrations and Customs Enforcement officials.

Sources in one Democratic Congressional office tell Heat Street an invitation was even extended to Meryl Streep, but it’s not clear how serious the invitation was (or whether it was even received).

In case you aren’t sure who is who, Langevin also intends to hold a press conference before the joint session, just to introduce media and viewers to the people on his subversive guest list. He expects 10 to 15 of his colleagues to participate.

In order to be an effective President, you have to build a Coalition. The most effective President in my lifetime did.

On July 27. 2012. John Heubush, Executive Director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation, wrote the following op ed for The Daily Caller

“You’re in the big leagues, now.”

So the speaker of the House said to the 40th president of the United States just days after his inauguration.

It was 1981. The 97th Congress was a mixed bag, with a Democratic-controlled House, led by Speaker Thomas “Tip” O’Neill, and a Senate held by Republicans who, for the first time since 1953, controlled a chamber of Congress.

But Ronald Reagan didn’t think “eight years as governor of one of the largest states in the union had exactly been the minor leagues.” Sacramento had been Reagan’s beta-site where nothing was accomplished until strong coalitions were formed. “It was important to develop an effective working relationship with my opponents in the legislature,” Reagan wrote, “our political disagreements not withstanding.”

What did this adversarial relationship with O’Neill and Democrats produce in the next two years? Caustic gamesmanship? A stand-off? On July 29, 1981, less than six months after Reagan took office, a strong bipartisan coalition in the House passed one of the largest tax cuts in American history, the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981. Two days later, the Senate followed suit.

How in the world did Reagan do it? Experience.

Matching wits with Jack Warner (of Warner Brothers) as head of the actors’ union and Jesse Unruh (speaker of the California State Assembly) as governor taught Reagan to come to the bargaining table prepared. “I’d learned while negotiating union contracts,” Reagan wrote, “that you seldom get everything you ask for.” (Years later, the press asked him about negotiating with Gorbachev. “It was easier than dealing with Jack Warner,” Reagan shot back.)

Although the Democrats were in a tough position after the Carter years, their big trump card was that nothing would get done unless Reagan won over a substantial number of them in the House. It’s no wonder that O’Neill was so full of braggadocio.

Somehow Reagan had to build a coalition.

The strategy to get the Economic Recovery Act passed by a conflicted Congress had two major parts.

First, Reagan would use his tremendous skills as a communicator by making repeated televised appeals to Congress and the American people. “Every time he spoke,” Reagan Chief of Staff Jim Baker recalled, “the needle moved.”

Second, the Legislative Strategy Group led by Baker and Ed Meese “did the grunt work” of inviting Democrats to the White House, while the president worked the phones. “I spent a lot of time in the spring and early summer of 1981 on the telephone and in meetings trying to build a coalition to get the nation’s recovery under way,” Reagan wrote. At the time, he even noted in his diary, “These Dems are with us on the budget and it’s interesting to hear some who’ve been here ten years or more say that it is their first time to ever be in the Oval Office. We really seem to be putting a coalition together.”

These “Dems” — the Boll Weevils — were Southern conservative Democrats who became key players in Reagan’s economic recovery strategy. It helped Reagan’s purpose that many represented districts that the president had carried in 1980. If they voted against a popular president, it could cost them their seats in 1982.

“To encourage the Boll Weevils to cross party lines,” journalist Lou Cannon wrote, “Reagan accepted a suggestion by James Baker and promised that he could not campaign in 1982 against any Democratic members of Congress who voted for both his tax and budget bills.” It was a shrewd and effective move.

The task of working together with the Opposition Party is a lot harder for President Trump than it was for President Reagan.

This is a completely different Democratic Party.

The brilliant Conservative Economist, Dr. Thomas Sowell once wrote,

…Perhaps the most remarkable feature of the world envisioned by today’s liberals is that it is a world where other people just passively accept whatever “change” liberals impose. In the world of Liberal Land, you can just take for granted all the benefits of the existing society, and then simply tack on your new, wonderful ideas that will make things better.

Liberal Ideas always cost taxpayer money…and they never make things better for the average American.

President Ronald Reagan once famously said,

It isn’t so much that liberals are ignorant. It’s just that they know so many things that aren’t so.

A quotation which also helps to explain the Far Left Liberals of the Democratic Party’s gross overestimation of the popularity of Liberal Ideals among Average Americans here in “Flyover Country”.

Their immature, bordering on manic, denial of the fact that Americans voted for change appears to be a part of an alternative reality that the “Special Snowflakes” who voted for Hillary Clinton and who compose the Far Left Base of the Modern Democratic Party, seem to have transported themselves into, immediately upon hearing of Donald J. Trump’s victory in last month’s Presidential Election.

The pain of their frustration is so immense over Clinton’s loss that they have created a reality in which Clinton beat Trump, having won the hearts and minds of the American People.

Somehow, as is being shown in the paid protests and the political shenanigans being planned by the Democrats for Trump’s first address to Congress, their undersized medulla oblongatas and oversized craniums will not allow them to accept the fact that Americans completely rejected their candidate, Hillary Clinton, and their Political Ideology on that fateful day in November.

So, they have retreated to that alternative reality, where they can feed and ride their unicorns somewhere over the rainbow and where they will find rest in their “Safe Space”.

Let them stay there.

The men and women of this nation, after 8 long, arduous years, finally, once again have an American President.

And, Modern American Liberals’ unending National Temper Tantrum is not helping their cause.

Instead it is backfiring spectacularly, deepening the divide between the isolated Liberal Metropolitan areas on the East and West Coasts and the “Sea of Red” as found on the 2016 Electoral Map, where the majority of average Americans live.

The Democrats should have figured out, after that glorious night of November 8, 2016, that Americans are ready to move on from their failed political ideology.

We are ready to MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN.

Until He Comes,

KJ

 

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