“Concern” About Trump’s Syrian Strike: Does America’s Compassion and Backbone End at Our Borders? (A KJ Saturday Morning Op Ed)

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To sit back hoping that someday, some way, someone will make things right is to go on feeding the crocodile, hoping he will eat you last – but eat you he will. – President Ronald Reagan

D-Day, also called the Battle of Normandy, was fought on June 6, 1944, between the Allied nations and German forces occupying Western Europe. To this day, almost 73 years later, it  still remains the largest seaborne invasion in history. Almost three million troops crossed the English Channel from England to Normandy to be used as human cannon fodder in an invasion of occupied France.

There has never been an exact count of the sacrifices made on D-Day. Although, it is estimated that more than 425,000 Allied and German troops were killed, wounded, or went missing during the battle. 209,000 of those who lost their lives were Allied forces. In addition to almost 200,000 German troops killed or wounded, the Allies also captured 200,000 soldiers. Captured Germans were sent to American prisoner-of-war camps at the rate of 30,000 per month, from D-Day until Christmas 1944. Between 15,000 and 20,000 French civilians were killed during the battle.

Basically, the invasion of Normandy was a success, due to sheer force of numbers. By July 1944, some one million Allied troops, mostly American, British, and Canadian, were entrenched in Normandy. During the great invasion, the Allies assembled nearly three million men and stored 16 million tons of arms, munitions, and supplies in Britain.

Among the young men who stepped off those boats, in a hail of gunfire, was a fellow named Edward, whom everyone called Ned, from the small town of Helena, Arkansas.  Already in his young life, Ned had been forced to drop out of school in the sixth grade, in order to work at the local movie theatre to help support his mother, brother, and sister, faced with the ravages of the Great Depression.

He was a gentle man who loved to laugh and sing, having recorded several 78 rpm records in the do-it-yourself booths of the day. And now, he found himself, a Master Sergeant in an Army Engineering Unit, stepping off a boat into the unknown, watching his comrades being mercilessly gunned down around him.

Ned, along with the rest of his unit who survived the initial assault, would go on to assist in the cleaning out of the Concentration Camps, bearing witness to man’s inhumanity to man.

The horrors he saw had a profound effect on Ned.  One which he would keep to himself for the remainder of his life.  While his children knew that he served with an Engineering Unit in World War II, they did not know the full extent of his service, until they found his medal, honoring his participation in the Invasion of Normandy, while going through his belongings, after he passed away on December 29, 1997.

I know this story is true because Ned was my Daddy. His birthday was Sunday, April 2nd.

I retell his story because of some of the reactions that I received to my article yesterday about President Trump’s Surgical Strike on the Syrian Air Force Base.

According to some commenters, we should not have cared that Syrian President Assad was slaughtering his own people…men, women, children, and babies, through the means of chemical weapons, which Former President Barack Hussein Obama and Former Secretary of State John Kerry assured us that the Radical Islamic Madman did not possess.

The horrific images of those innocent little ones struggling to breathe their last breaths or simply lying there, already gone to meet the One Who Made Them, did not move these commenters at all.

Oh, no. They were much too politically astute for that.

It makes me wonder…what would have been their reaction to the boxcars full of European Jewish Families headed to Hitler’s Concentration Camps?

Would they have ignored what was happening to those around them?

Would they have waved as the trains went past?

And, don’t give me that usual bull that the United States of America does the same thing as Syria.

America is the most generous country on the face of God’s Green Earth.

The Faith of Our Father has imbued us with a Legacy of Courage and Caring.

…And a sense of right and wrong.

My parents and the other members of the Greatest Generation were a living testimony  to my statement.

America cannot afford to be an isolated nation.

Trump fired a warning shot, reasserting our strength as a nation and our place as a World Leader.

Enough with the pearl-clutching.

Until He Comes,

KJ

 

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One Response to ““Concern” About Trump’s Syrian Strike: Does America’s Compassion and Backbone End at Our Borders? (A KJ Saturday Morning Op Ed)”

  1. hocuspocus13 Says:

    Reblogged this on hocuspocus13 and commented:
    jinxx♠xoxo

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